Fanzine — #modrevival



I-D November 1989 'MODERN MYTHS'

I-D Short and sweet insight into the jazz and modernist London scene in the deep mid winter of 1989. Nice mod-revival v acid jazz mod fashion listing some stalwart styles still being worn today.  The Mod revival scene had kicked off in 1978 a decade and a bit earlier, thanks in part to Quadrophenia and The Jam, and so no surprise that the scene and overall interest had dwindled especially in the capital, I guess it'd be the same for any counter culture. Just to put things in context here; the cover of this I-D November 1989 has a sub-header 'The New Age'.  The dawning of a new decade (1990's) saw the rave crowd wearing Rifat Ozbek inspired floaty white...

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THE FACE January 1991

Many, many Mays ago doing a newspaper round as a kid- at the weekends my route would change to the posher side of my parish, where the 'Sunday supplement' crowd lived.  The toff kids would also get some decent titles like: Arena, Blitz, R.A.D, Sky, The Face and I'D, sometimes a bundle of them, they weighed a ton.  Back on the round taking well earned breaks akin to a Tenzing Norgay sherpa, I'd flick through a few of the magazines: Blitz, The Face and I-D jumped grabbed my attention most of the time.  As the paper rounds went on and certain houses were no longer delivered to and my despatch bag got lighter- I learnt of the demise of Blitz...

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The Music Machine 1979

        I've got my parka on. It's got a Union Jack and an Irish tricolour on the right sleeve. I never did play the game, me. I'm proud of it, the parka. Sort of. I've had it a couple of months. Someone told me it was original, though I'm never sure what that meant. Whatever, it fits perfectly over my two-tone suit, the one I got at Second Time Around. And if I had a scooter, it would keep me warm. Only trouble is: it's not right. I know it's not right. It doesn't have a fishtail, the back of it just cuts straight across. The fur on the hood is too... furry. And the colour is...

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The Pause windbreaker

        The original version of the Anglozine Pause windbreaker was inspired by a brand called DMob based on Beak street in the 1980’s.   Their jacket was called the XLNT James jacket.  The fascination for this windbreaker started for me when I first saw The Style Council video for “Shout to the top” the bands 1985 charitable pro-miner song. The complete look of the hooded windbreaker, white jeans, loafers and shades is timeless.    The Anglozine version of the windbreaker has been re-worked making it perfect for everyday wear today.   Made in north London using British mills (Halley Stevensons or Brisbane Moss; the lining is made in Essex, the PU Canvas printed check panels from Kensal Green in London,...

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